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The ability to thoroughly and consciously demand the respect of your peers and elders is only shown through subtle dignity.

Pointing out that you need respect, recognition, or allowing others to step all over you can be prevented by this strong inner aura of power you exude to the environment around you. 

The only person that can empower themselves is you, seize that moment.

sikoot:

"They say that if God loves you, He will let you live a long life, but I wish that He loved me a little less. I wish that I didn’t live long enough to see my country in ruins."  -Ahmad, a 102 year old Syrian refugee.
photo: UNHCR, A. McConnell

sikoot:

"They say that if God loves you, He will let you live a long life, but I wish that He loved me a little less. I wish that I didn’t live long enough to see my country in ruins."
-Ahmad, a 102 year old Syrian refugee.

photo: UNHCR, A. McConnell

(via lilylock)

Anonymous said: so i have an "arab problem" i want to talk to someone about. You know how gossip rich and hypocritical the females can be. how do you deal with that? im even try to find islamic resources on such a topic. people who you consider friends but then slander you and discredit you behind your back. it hurts because it feels like a rejection and betrayal from a friend when all you've done is been too kind and too open with you home and everything else. idk

"O you who believe! Avoid much suspicion, in deeds some suspicions are sins. And spy not neither backbite one another. Would one of you like to eat the flesh of his dead brother? You would hate it (so hate backbiting). And fear Allah, verily, Allah is The One Who accepts repentance, Most Merciful" 

(Qur’an 49: 12)

Anonymous said: I think it's so cool that Jews, Christians and Muslims all have the same god. We're on the right path :) Thanks for answering my ask!

For Academic religious studies, that’s how it’s categorized.

I personally believe that every civilization, religious or spiritual organization , Abrahamic or not ,references a higher deity that we all personally share. 

I think the message that Buddha, Zoroaster, Animist cultures and everyone under the sun comes from the same source. 

Anonymous said: What do you think about the rebellion Arabs did against the Turks with the help of english colonialists?

The Ottomans towards the end of their reign were an absolute misery to the Middle East but seeking help of the scummy Imperialists was the worst decision ever made in the Middle East.

All of the so called rebels in no way shape or form represented the Arab populaces they hailed from and worked with the French and English to carve countries as their personal estate in exchange for their obedience. 

We still suffer from that disgusting legacy until today. 

Anonymous said: Hi, I really like and appreciate this blog and the effort you're putting in to it, it is very informative, but I have one wish: please don't refer to the Christian god as "God" in quotations, as if it wasn't a real thing, at least to us. It honestly feels disrespective and I wish you could change that in the future- to "your God" or "the Christian God", for example. I hope you understand. Thank you. :)

Thank you. I honestly did not notice that I made such a differentiation, nor did I intend that; if I did I apologize.

However, that being said, I would never put God in quotations, seeing I believe in the same higher being as you, despite our different religious traditions.

As you know, God is the deity that all Abrahamic religions believe in and has become a constant in the English language as well. We as Muslims believe in the same diety. 

thepeacefulterrorist:

The Muslim Community Rises with Ferguson

For the last 70 days the youth of Ferguson, Missouri have led protests and vigils every night in remembrance of 18 year old Michael Brown and the countless other black lives that are cut short at the rate of at least 400 annually by police in the United States. This past weekend protesters merged on Ferguson for a weekend of action called for by the youth of Ferguson with actions, protests and acts of civil disobedience taking place from Friday to Monday, October 10th to the 13th.

Mustafa Abdullah is a community organizer originally from North Carolina who moved to St. Louis two years ago to work for the ACLU of Eastern Missouri. In the days after Michael Brown’s shooting Mustafa went to work with a number of other Muslim leaders locally and nationally to organizer Muslims for Ferguson who are helping to lead the call to get American Muslims more deeply involved in community organizing around issues of racial justice, mass incarceration and police brutality throughout the United States. What follows is an in depth interview with Mustafa Abdullah about the organizing taking place on the ground in Ferguson, and his hopes for the Muslim community, as he stated clearly to us in our interview,

“my hope is that Muslims really begin to see that our own liberation, and our own freedom are intricately intertwined with the freedom of the youth that are on the street in Ferguson.”

Ummah Wide: Within a few days of the killing of Michael Brown you all started organizing the Muslim community to be actively engaged in what is happening in Ferguson. Can you tell us about Muslims for Ferguson, what the local response has been like and also what the national response has been so far to this call to action?

Mustafa Abdullah: In seeking justice in Ferguson, and justice for Mike Brown for me it’s about building a just world and it’s about building the values that are of the utmost importance to me. I take very seriously the verses in the Qur’an that if one part of the body is in pain then the whole body wakes up in a fevered state and I think that is making a deeper metaphorical statement about world. That we are aware of the pain that people are going through and a we have a belief that we should be there to support communities in ways that are authentic.

This is exactly what we have been trying to build with Muslims for Ferguson which has really been a movement that has developed rapidly and organically. Two days after the killing of Michael Brown, I had been traveling that weekend and I came back to the office Monday morning and my inbox was flooded with a couple hundred emails, a ton of voice mails and around 9:30 that morning I got a call from Linda Sarsour, the Executive Director of the Arab American Association of New York. She asked me, ‘Mustafa where is the Muslim community on this?’

That hadn’t even come to mind for me yet because as Muslim organizers and advocates in our community sometimes it feels like we are in real isolation and she brought that reality check to me. When she made that call to me and she posed that question, she also said that we need to get with the Muslim community. So I called the executive director of CAIR St. Louis, Faizan Syed and we drafted a solidarity letter together addressed to Michael Brown’s family and we got 20 mosques and Islamic centers, all the major ones here in the St. Louis area to sign onto this letter that we had sent out.

Then I had a conversation with Muhammad Malik an organizer from Miami who has been involved with the Dream Defenders and the anti-police brutality movement there around the police killing of 20 year old Israel Hernandez last year. He suggested that we do a national call for the Muslim community, because Muslims need to hear from people that are on the ground in Ferguson. So we organized a few days later this national call and we had over 250 people on the call where we featured myself, Faizan Syed, and a few national Muslim leaders, Muhammad Malik, Linda Sarsour and Imam Dawood Walid.

Since then we have done a number of follow up calls with local organizers and activists on the ground here, including Torey Russell organizer for Hands Up United who was the first organizer on the ground the evening after Michael Brown was killed. That night he organized 12 other people to protest with him outside of the police department and the protests snow balled and people had the courage to come out and face the snipers, rubber bullets, and face the tear gas and face the tanks, and the long range acoustic device system, all this military equipment and intimidation from law enforcement, to peacefully protest the killing of Michael Brown and calling for the arrest of the officer who did the shooting.

Since then our online and Facebook presence has grown rapidly, members of the Muslim community have reached out to me, to Linda and Muhammad, and there are a number of organizers that we are in relationship with that are so thankful for all the people on the ground. I know that Muslims have donated to organizations on the ground doing this work, particularly to the Organization for Black Struggle who have been doing this police brutality work for 35 plus years.

This all really culminated over the last weekend when we had a block of Muslims and Palestinian rights folk as an organized block at this march and rally where there were at least 5 or 6 times where the rights of Muslims and Palestinians were brought up by speakers, where non-Muslim and non-Arabs speakers.

I think that for the Muslims who have participated, we are really beginning to see that our experiences of racial profiling, our experiences of surveillance, their experiences with their countries being torn up by war and the increasing militarization of the world and American police departments. We are really beginning to see that all of this is tied up with and connected to the experiences of African Americans, particularly black and brown youth in this country.

What my hope is, is that they are seeing their own liberation, their own freedom as being intricately intertwined with the freedom of the youth that are on the street in Ferguson.

The youth that have talked to us and shared their stories of being pulled over while driving a nice car in town, their experiences of being stopped and frisked on the street, their experience of not having any good after school programs with almost no options as to what to do with their lives, these are stories that we need to be listening to. One of the first memories that many of these organizers and youth in the streets of Ferguson have is when they were first in the streets getting hit with tear gas and rubber bullets for the first time and getting tweets from Palestinians telling them how to deal with the tear gas and the rubber bullets.

thepalestineyoudontknow:

Details from around AL-Aqsa mosque in Palestine by Nour ilayan.

This collection shows the great Islamic architecture of the buildings inside the mosque - including the Dome of the Rock which was constructed by the order of  Umayyad Caliph Abd al-Malik  - even in the smallest details . 

(via palestiiinee)

mosabelking:

In central Bahrain stands a large mesquite tree known as the Tree of Life. It’s the only tree that survives in that part of the desert, and it’s been there for 400 years. Currently, scientists have no idea where it’s finding water and nutrients.
Via -deathmaydie:

mosabelking:

In central Bahrain stands a large mesquite tree known as the Tree of Life. It’s the only tree that survives in that part of the desert, and it’s been there for 400 years. Currently, scientists have no idea where it’s finding water and nutrients.

Via -deathmaydie:

(via palestinianpapi)


Muslim leaders from across the globe paid tribute Holocaust victims this week during a visit to Auschwitz, the former Nazi concentration camp, where they prayed at the Wall of Death for those who were killed by genocide and suffered under violent anti-Semitism. 
The imams, who hailed from Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Bosnia, Palestine, Indonesia, Nigeria, Turkey and the United States, performed Islamic prayers while facing Mecca as part of a Holocaust awareness visit organized in part by the International Religious Freedom office of the U.S. State Department.
"What can you say? You’re speechless. What you have seen is beyond human imagination," Imam Mohamed Magid, President of the U.S.-based Islamic Society of North America, told Agence France-Presse.
"Whether in Europe today or in the Muslim world, my call to humanity: End racism for God’s sake, end anti-Semitism for God’s sake, end Islamophobia for God’s sake, end sexism for God’s sake… Enough is enough," said Magid, who leads the All Dulles Area Muslim Society in Northern Virginia.
(via The Huffington Post.)

Muslim leaders from across the globe paid tribute Holocaust victims this week during a visit to Auschwitz, the former Nazi concentration camp, where they prayed at the Wall of Death for those who were killed by genocide and suffered under violent anti-Semitism. 

The imams, who hailed from Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Bosnia, Palestine, Indonesia, Nigeria, Turkey and the United States, performed Islamic prayers while facing Mecca as part of a Holocaust awareness visit organized in part by the International Religious Freedom office of the U.S. State Department.

"What can you say? You’re speechless. What you have seen is beyond human imagination," Imam Mohamed Magid, President of the U.S.-based Islamic Society of North America, told Agence France-Presse.

"Whether in Europe today or in the Muslim world, my call to humanity: End racism for God’s sake, end anti-Semitism for God’s sake, end Islamophobia for God’s sake, end sexism for God’s sake… Enough is enough," said Magid, who leads the All Dulles Area Muslim Society in Northern Virginia.

(via The Huffington Post.)

(Source: thereligionofpeace, via arabianhikikomori)

Anonymous said: What do you know about the Hadramis and their descendants?

The people of Hadramout, (area between Yemen and Oman) and their descendants, the Hadramis are scattered all around Asia, and Africa alongside their native Yemen.

Their large diaspora, up to 2 million in total, are due to them being very well known in trade in antiquity and are considered the first Muslims or Arabs to travel to areas like Southeast Asia and the Far East as well. A lot of their diaspora live in areas like Sri Lanka, East Africa, alongside India and Indonesia. 

Anonymous said: Hi,do you think there is a chance of love in such saudi society ,i mean i don't like the idea of marrying someone i don't love and not intending to , yet i don't have any man in my life literally , i don't love somebody and as much as i know no one does , but what can i say to my parents and what do you suggest me to do ? I am sorry if I am asking such personal Question but i trust you

Well you know your parents better than anyone. A lot of people marry based on love, I know my own grandfather did almost 60+ years ago, and there’s a lot of examples of people that do that.

However, since romance before marriage seems taboo you might want to frame it a different way, no Saudi parent wants to be put in that position. Be smart about it. 

Anonymous said: How would you address the "the bigger the claim, the bigger the proof has to be" thing. It bothers me a lot. Like a lot. When I'm trying to hold on to faith.

partytilfajr:

Salaam alykum,

That claim might be accurate in various situations, but when it comes to my faith in God, I don’t think you need gigantic amounts of proof.

Gravity is defined as “the force that attracts a body toward the center of the earth, or toward any other physical body having mass.”

That’s a gigantic claim and it can be proven quite easily, by jumping in the air and coming back down to the ground.

I look at God like gravity or friction, ever-present and manifest in all that I do, governing the rules and structures of my life, where I make choices relative to what those natural laws are, just as I physically move relative to the confines of gravity and friction.

And yet, when people try to rationalize the choices or actions of God, I am confused, because it is logically absurd to attempt to do so.

For instance, an ant and a human being both exist in the same physical plane. An ant, however, will never be able to understand the concept of driving a car. The ant will never know the difference between an SUV and a sports car, and this gap between the ant and human is seen as so vast that whatever actions a human may choose could never be understood or fathomed by the ant.

What can a human being create by itself? Another human? Even then, a human must have another person in order to do that.

So this human attempts to rationalize God. God is The Creator of space, time, gravity, and friction… God is The Source of the very concept of existence, of life and of death, of beginning and end, The Sustainer of all that exists and will exist.

Therefore, if an ant cannot fathom the choices and perceptions of a mere human, what is the chance that we may fathom the choices of God?

I dunno, “questions that make you think” or whatever that deal with God and faith generally disinterest me, because they have a faulty logical framework.

I hope this helps, insha Allah.

Anonymous said: what do arabs think of obama? hbu too?

Arabs overseas? Obama, Bush or anyone that heads this Empire is all the same face to them.

If you’re droning them, they hate you all the same. 

Me personally, I honestly could care less for him. He’s someone that’s being put into an extremely scripted task that has designated roles and designated advisers designating you to do exactly what they want and you are being pay-rolled by a select wealthy class hellbent on controlling the world.

Honestly, nothing, absolutely nothing he does is a surprise, and the occasional time he speaks up against something is riddled with hypocrisy because even that is scripted and guided for him to do. 

Anonymous said: Do you know any hadeeths on choosing friends and how friends can effect you?

"The example of a good companion and a bad companion is like that of the seller of musk, and the one who blows the blacksmith’s bellows. So as for the seller of musk then either he will grant you some, or you buy some from him, or at least you enjoy a pleasant smell from him. As for the one who blows the blacksmith’s bellows then either he will burn your clothes or you will get an offensive smell from him."

-The Prophet Muhammad(S) 

[Al-Bukhari and Muslim]

 
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