Arab Swag

A blog all about Arab Culture
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The lady in pink .

(Source: 1001arabianights, via omesh1988)

ifalasteen:

Rammun, Palestine 
Early in the 20th Century

ifalasteen:

Rammun, Palestine 

Early in the 20th Century

(via carry-on-my-wayward-superwholock)

Anonymous said: For the amount of disrespectful and offensive comments you've made about America and American soldiers... you should at least be grateful to live in a country where you have the freedom to go on the Internet and post your ignorant opinions in the first place...

You should be thankful to every Arab and Persian that invented the foundations of modern math, logistics, analog computers and are consistently innovating worldwide in the information system industry that set the stage for the internet to even come to a reality.

Get on your knees and beg me to not trash you like I trashed everyone else and instead be humble and read my words carefully:

I am an American despite your ignorance and I will continuously call out imbeciles that kill others in the name of the tax dollars I pay day in and day out.

simplistic-things said: Hey Arab Swag, since we'll never reach an agreement in this argument, and it really seems like you're quite fed up with racism in this country, why don't ya just leave?

Naw, I like America and I am entitled to every little privilege over here and I will indulge in every little thing and I will fight tooth and nail to return every little thing that was removed from me to begin with from my parents so I can lavish in the financial gain and even pay back my relatives overseas that still suffer from your ignorance.

You can leave though, you’re an ignorant girl that’s probably prospering from some generational wealth that was unjustly brought to begin with. Pair that with your ancestors probably trampled on the lives of indigenous Native Americans while you were sipping on your coolaid 200 years later. I on the other hand was forced to come here, or else I would have been living among my relatives rather than in diaspora. And you know who is to blame? Western foreign policy and idiots like you that support it.

Make your leave hasty though, I hear France is beautiful and racist this time of year, I’ll even pay for your one way ticket to go and never come back.

Anonymous said: I'm sorry that your culture (if im not being offensive, i by not any means, want to) have to suffer for this USA liberty crusade and their people who still live in their vietnam, and im sorry that 9/11 just turned to be the celebration of the beginning of so much suffering. i send you strength and patience from Chile,we who suffered the same American treatment the same day, almost 30 years before. and it pains me that the only thing we could have in common these days is not a matter of culture.

Maaaan this gave me so many chills, God bless you <333

lion-of-babylon:

تبقى بغدادي منارة الشرق رغم انوف الحاقدين

lion-of-babylon:

تبقى بغدادي منارة الشرق رغم انوف الحاقدين

(via 3arabiy-deactivated20131213)

Anonymous said: What do you mean when you say "ethnic ties"? If a group of people are colonized and interbreed with the colonizer, wouldn't that create an ethnic tie?

I think a big misconception is that the Arabs married into these populations frequently to the point that a majority of these populations have a mixed heritage. That is refuted by genetic tests in all of North Africa that show almost a 90% genetic trace(in some areas) to Ethnic Amazigh, Copts and non-Arab groups. 

Another misconception is that all of North Africa was force-ably Arabized to begin with. Many of the land acquisitions in areas like Egypt or Libya were requested by the populations to oust the Byzantines. Furthermore, the Arabs themselves in the era of the Rashidun had built garrison cities to specifically preserve the cultures of these areas and to not Arabize them to begin with. This is most exemplified by the Arab founded cities that became the biggest and most influential cities in these countries like Cairo in Egypt or Kairouan in Tunisia.

This non-Arabization policy was reversed by the Ummayads that sought to annex everyone within their midst, but even then the Arabization policy was not even finalized until fifty years ago with the development of the Arab League. 

Anonymous said: Sorry to ask a stupid question but are North Africans like arabized Arabs? (Algeria, Libya, Sudan, Morocco)? Btw really love your blog

The term Arabized Arabs only refers to Ethnic Arabs from the Peninsula with a shared ancestor of Prophet Abraham and the Pure Arabs of the Arabian Peninsula, this would categorize the Prophet Muhammad and Quraysh as Arabized Arabs.

Arabized Peoples refers to people with no ethnic ties to the Arabian Peninsula, such as Egypt, Sudan, Tunisia, Libya, Algeria, Morocco and so on but still identify as Arab peoples due to either cultural imperialism, assimilation, or annexation to the Arab identity for political purposes. 

Read the distinction here

Oh and thank you my friend. 

"Here lies an Arab citizen&#8230;He died trying to enunciate the R in the word Hurriyah(Freedom)&#8221;
1989-2013

"Here lies an Arab citizen…He died trying to enunciate the R in the word Hurriyah(Freedom)”

1989-2013

(Source: ftyani, via longlostpoet)


الحرية
If you live, live free
or die like the trees, standing up

الحرية

If you live, live free

or die like the trees, standing up

(Source: alyibnawi, via romanianprincesss)

Today we are so used to the idea of Egypt as “Arab” that it seems unimaginable that Egyptians ever thought of themselves as anything else. In fact, I made this assumption myself when I first began writing this memoir. It was only when my own discordant memories failed to make sense that I was compelled to look more carefully into the history of our Arab identity. Eventually I began to see the constructed nature of our Arab identity as it was formed and re-formed to serve the political interests of the day. For example, during the years of my adolescence and early adulthood, Egypt underwent several changes in name, reflecting the shifting definitions of our identity. Under Nasser, when the idea that we were Arab was incessantly hammered home in the media, the word “Egypt” was removed altogether from the country’s name—and we became the United Arab Republic as we united, briefly, with Syria. Through the Nasser era the country retained that name, even though the union with Syria dissolved within a couple of years. Eventually, in a sign of shifting political winds, Sadat brought back the word “Egypt” and we became the Arab Republic of Egypt. Of course, the issue of identity, a profoundly ambiguous matter for Egypt, was inescapably and deeply political. Sadat, who published his autobiography during his presidency, actually called his book In Search of Identity.

Leila Ahmed, "A Border Passage: From Cairo to America - A Woman’s Journey" (via zaman-al-samt)

(via yanorayanora)

merelypassion:

Old Sana’a, Yemen :)

merelypassion:

Old Sana’a, Yemen :)

(via turkishshaggy1-deactivated20130)

The Three Types of Arabization and the Arab Sphere of Influence

The Arabs, known through antiquity as the original inhabitants of the Arabian Peninsula had reached great cultural heights through the advent of several of their empires. Unfortunately, every empire has its long strawed effect in terms of expansionist endeavors, and the Arabs are no exception. This has led to the often expanded meaning of their identity and thus swallowing up several other cultures within their midst in favor of the “higher culture” they presented, which is often interpreted as imposed unjustly or favored at certain times for various reasons. 

Furthermore, this has led to an often confusing idea of what an Arab is and what Arabization means to us today. That being said, there are three types of Arabization that have occurred in the Middle East and North Africa. I will use the terms “Ancient Arabs”, “Pure Arabs” and “Arabized Arabs” distinctively, and I would encourage you all to refer to this genealogical map tree to understand the Three Arab Bloodlines (That all have one common ancestor) and the “Arabized Arabs” are not to be confused with Arabized Peoples. 

1. Dominant Arabization in Arab inhabited regions outside Arabia

Although the Arabs had definitely originated in the Arabian Peninsula, it is without doubt that many of the Ancient Arabs such as the Amalek, the Nabateans, Himyarites and others also inhabited areas like Palestine, Lebanon, Iraq, Syria and Jordan at the same time as many of the same first empires of these regions like the Phoenicians, Hittites, Assyrians, Bablyonians and others ruled over Ethnic Arabs in these areas alongside other ethnic groups as well. Thus, the current inhabitants of these lands are a genetic mix of all of these various cultures and civilizations, but due to the dominance of Arab culture in these regions, it had swallowed up any other former influences but kept the Arab label as the main identifier later on. This does not mean that Palestinians, Iraqis, or others who can trace their ancestry to Arab tribes are “Arabized” Peoples, as they are as Arab in ancestry as their fellow Saudis and Yemenis, however they also have a significant genetic makeup of other civilizations in the region as detailed by the high amount of Arab traced Haplogroups in these areas. (1)

2. Arabization of Non-Arab Peoples. 

The Arab Conquests of areas like North Africa, Sudan, or Spain were definitely the very first efforts that Arab dynasties like the Ummayads had attempted to engulf other regions in their midst and annex to their empires. Through the efforts of other Arab Dynasties in North Africa, and tribes like Banu Hilal, these areas were at times forceably converted to Arabic speaking regions. Moreover, through many modern efforts seen in the Arab League in areas like Libya, Tunisia, Algeria or Morocco, the various countries’ policies were to disown their Amazigh identities and often ban even naming these areas from naming Amazigh/Berber names or identifying with such labels. The tragic inheritable inferiority complex is also seen in countries like Egypt that have a heavily rooted cultural pedigree through Ancient Egypt but often opt out for such nationalism and instead participate in Pan-Arabism in its stead. Without doubt, North Africa has even become the center of learning of many Arabic studies, Arab History, and Literature as seen through the cultural and intellectual circles of Al Azhar or University of al-Karaouine or through Egyptian writers such as Syed Qutb.(2) This can also be extended to African countries like Sudan or Chad that are Arabic Speaking regions and many identify as Arab although they have no ethnic ties to the Arabian Peninsula. 

3. Self Declared Arabization:

Modern Arabization is often seen in the Persian Gulf area that have historically been largely uninhabited regions until the Oil Boom but have had inherited a massive sphere of influence from Persia or India. That being said, through the various politics of the region, obtaining a “Gulf” citizenship has become a very privileged acquisition, as it often allows one to participate in several governmental programs that are very generous to its citizens. Since the borders and declarations of these areas’ independence has been fairly recent, and the expat population had always been large in areas like Dubai or Musqat, anyone within the midst had been declared a citizen, regardless of their ethnic background. Due to its proximity in the Arabian Peninsula and being in the center of Arab Culture and influence, many Baluch, Indians, Persians and others who had become part of the fabric of the country such as Kuwait, Bahrain, UAE, or Oman(and to a lesser extent Qatar), these citizens had definitely become more and more increasingly assimilated to the countries they live in. This can be seen through many of these citizens taking on Arab identities, inheriting Arab Superiority complexes, and even taking on the Arabic language with its heavy Indian or Persian influence, but declaring it as distinctively “Khaleeji”. 

In conclusion, Arabization is a massive cultural phenomena, comparable to European Imperialism, or most distinctively British imperialism as well. The various acts of such Arab dynasties however does not outline the nature of the spread of Islam, as the tenants of Islam had banned anyone from forcing anyone to accept Islam as a religion. The expansionist nature of many of these Arab empires is distinctive rather of Arab supremacy tactics and beliefs than the tenants of Islam that contradict such horrendous acts. 

Sources:

(1): "DNA Ancestry Maps." DNA Ancestry Maps. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Sept. 2013. <http://dna.xyvy.info/>.

(2):Hourani, Albert, A History of the Arab Peoples, New York: Warner Books, 1991. (ISBN 0-446-39392-4)

(3):"Islam in the World Today: A Handbook of Politics, Religion, Culture, and Society"Werner Ende, Udo Steinbach. 2002. p. 533.

(Source: bint-aljamaal, via bu-hashem)

Saudi Photographer and Model

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