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76945-costume-research-and-more:

Hijaz, Western Region

The Ka‘bah at Makkah (first established at the time of the prophet Abraham) is for Muslims the “Bait Allah” or “House of God”. It is the most sacred spot on Earth, and, with Mount Arafat a few miles away, the focus of the annual hajj or Muslim pilgrimage.

Makkah and Jeddah for centuries have been the melting-pot of the Muslim world, and this is reflected in dress styles.

Hijaz milayah large rectangular wrap worn to go out. It is made of two panels with decorative bands and tassels along the edge. The silk fabric was either imported from India or Indonesia.

Mansoojat Foundation for Saudi Arabian Traditional Costumes Online

rebellemagazine:

Women training to be doctors at the Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in 1885

rebellemagazine:

Women training to be doctors at the Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in 1885

(via epiphanyofthemind)

(Source: chaouiaa, via arabianglow)

Anonymous said: I hate all these labels and categories.....why can't we be only "muslims"

Islam is a massive academic endeavor with several paths, ideas, discussions, debates, and other forms of wonderful intellectual discourse.

I feel all these different paths is really what makes Islam so unique and beautiful, since it attests to the great intellectual traditions it houses and exemplifies. You shouldn’t hate the different schools of Law, schools of Theology or even sects to be completely honest.

The key problem is Muslims, unlike their predecessors have taken these ideas and developed superiority complexes in regards to each other. These “Labels and categories” have existed in harmony for centuries, without any problems and were respected and esteemed as well.

sansoon:

sansoon:

Breakfast in Amman. Teteh is the best

because I’m having withdrawals

:’(

sansoon:

sansoon:

Breakfast in Amman. Teteh is the best

because I’m having withdrawals

:’(

(via omesh1988)

jilbabstyle:

does anyone know what city this is from? looks futuristic. 

Kuwait. 

jilbabstyle:

does anyone know what city this is from? looks futuristic. 

Kuwait. 

(via desertrose7)

(Source: , via bu-hashem)

(via omesh1988)

Sheikh Zayed you were majestic. 

Sheikh Zayed you were majestic. 

(via arabiandelilah)

willdrawfor:

 “ When the martyrs go to sleep, I wake up, and I tell them, ‘May you wake up on a homeland, made of clouds and anxious of love.’ ”
 Painted on the side of a Shatila Mosque

willdrawfor:

 “ When the martyrs go to sleep, I wake up, and I tell them, ‘May you wake up on a homeland, made of clouds and anxious of love.’ ”

 Painted on the side of a Shatila Mosque

(via ritaandtherifle)

و ما التأنيث لأسم الشمس عيب
و لا التذكير فخر للهلال
For Feminizing the name of the Sun is not a shame
Nor Masculinizing the Crescent moon a praise.

 ابو الطيب المتنبي

Abu At-Tayib Al Mutannabi

(via thescientista-deactivated201310)

brownriot:

Palestinian school children stand at the patio of their UNRWA school on the first day of the new school year in Gaza City, on August 25. (Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images)

brownriot:

Palestinian school children stand at the patio of their UNRWA school on the first day of the new school year in Gaza City, on August 25. (Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images)

(via adoseofrevolution)

A Rainy Damascene Evening

Before the images of war and carnage had defined the news about Syria, there was a mystical presence and beauty to the ancient city of Damascus, the oldest continuously inhabited city in the world. It was true to its name, the city of Jasmine, as the flowers adorned its city walls, and its fragrance had filled my memory in a way that I can never forget, although I visited shortly ten years ago…

The city was magnificent, its walls were ancient, its galore was magnanimous, and its presence was heavenly. It did not have the technological finesse of the developed cities of the world, but it reserved a space for a world that was being endangered by Western cultural and materialistic infiltration. It was truly amazing to be able to still see a preserved area of an old city that housed civilizations from the Ghassinids, to the Romans and the Ummayads that had left a wondrous mosque that served as a cultural staple for centuries to come.

For the Ummayad Mosque was almost as old as the city itself, as its architecture was defined by Islamic elements, and its ancient Christian heritage as well. It always blew my mind as to how such a magnificent structure could be built without the guide of technological assistance and how precise and intricate the designs were. For the courtyard housed a beautiful presence, as the birds had inhabited its roofs, and the people had basked in the subtle atmosphere the Mosque was defined by. 

If one looked closely, one could see the charred torn down houses of the Palestinian refugees in the edges of the city. Never had I seen such a wretched existence in my life, and yet these Palestinians were content with any little home they were housed in, as their original lands were torn in front of their eyes. Still dependent on the old age promise that the Arab leaders would “regain their honor”, they stood generations after generations  left to rot in a sub-existence only recognizable to them as survival. 

Although Damascus was defined by its morbid melancholy in many of its parts, it also preserved one of the greatest cultural elements of any major Middle Eastern city: a Souk. As I had entered the Souk, I was astonished by its Levantine elegance, its ancient atmosphere, and it almost began to feel as if one were in a Medieval presence if it weren’t for the constant reminders of English words that were hung at the edge of the stores. 

Damascus was one of the safest cities I had ever visited, for at the time for Iftar, the Cannons were shot in the distance to be followed by the Athan to be given off in every corner of the city. The Rain had trickled as we walked the streets of Damascus, and it truly gave a wonderful ambiance ushering in this rainy Damascene evening that I shall forever immortalize in my memory. 

I only had visited this city for a day, and fell in love with it. I can only imagine those who have lived their whole lives in such beauty, and yet they live an agonized existence day in and day out. I wish to see the day where Damascus could be beautiful again. 

END

 
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